argue a position essay

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Argue a position essay

The argument in this one? Teachers should incorporate more relevant pop culture texts into their curriculum. This thesis statement also gives a specific reason for making the argument above: To give students an understanding of the role of the American Dream in contemporary life. An actual image of you killing your argumentative essay prompts after reading this article! These are the parts that will flesh out your argument and support the claim you made in your thesis statement.

Like other types of essays, argumentative essays typically have three main sections: the introduction, the body, and the conclusion. Within those sections, there are some key elements that a reader—and especially an exam scorer or professor—is always going to expect you to include. To make the most of the body section, you have to know how to support your claim your thesis statement , what evidence and explanations are and when you should use them, and how and when to address opposing viewpoints.

This probably feels like a big deal! The body and conclusion make up most of the essay, right? There are three main areas where you want to focus your energy as you develop a strategy for how to write an argumentative essay: supporting your claim—your thesis statement—in your essay, addressing other viewpoints on your topic, and writing a solid conclusion. Supporting your claim in your thesis statement is where that research comes in handy.

Remember your reader? Evidence can be material from any authoritative and credible outside source that supports your position on your topic. In some cases, evidence can come in the form of photos, video footage, or audio recordings.

In other cases, you might be pulling reasons, facts, or statistics from news media articles, public policy, or scholarly books or journals. There are some clues you can look for that indicate whether or not a source is credible , such as whether:. On some exams, like the AP exams , you may be given pretty strict parameters for what evidence to use and how to use it. You might be given six short readings that all address the same topic, have 15 minutes to read them, then be required to pull material from a minimum of three of the short readings to support your claim in an argumentative essay.

When the sources are handed to you like that, be sure to take notes that will help you pick out evidence as you read. Highlight, underline, put checkmarks in the margins of your exam. Those highlights and check marks might just turn into your quotes, paraphrases, or summaries of evidence in your completed exam essay. Now you know that taking a strategic mindset toward evidence and explanations is critical to grasping how to write an argumentative essay. You never want to just stick some quotes from an article into your paragraph and call it a day.

Instead, you want to comment on the evidence in a way that helps your reader see how it supports the position you stated in your thesis. Understanding how to incorporate evidence and explanations to your advantage is really important. Instead, their evaluation is going to focus on the way you incorporated evidence and explained it in your essay. Opposing viewpoints function kind of like an elephant in the room. In fact, your audience might even buy into an opposing viewpoint and be waiting for you to show them why your viewpoint is better.

But why? Without being too obvious, it might be worth pointing this out when you address the opposition. Great conclusions get your readers to check the "I Agree" box on your entire essay. So much has happened since you stated your thesis in the introduction! And why waste a whole paragraph—the very last thing your audience is going to read—on just repeating yourself? One thing you want to avoid in your conclusion, though: presenting new supporting points or new evidence. That can just be confusing for your reader.

For some aspiring argumentative essay writers, showing is better than telling. Thesis Statement: In order to most effectively protect user data and combat the spread of disinformation, the U. Here we go:. Example Body Paragraph: Data mining has affected a lot of people in recent years.

Facebook has 2. In fact, Mark Zuckerberg himself supports adopting a global framework for privacy and data protection, which would protect more users than before. Ask yourself: does this make a claim that some people might agree with, but others might disagree with? The answer is yes. Also, there are definitely good, reliable sources out there that will help this writer prove their argument.

So this paper is off to a strong start! The topic sentence should make a point that gets right at that, instead of throwing out a random fact about data mining. For example, it would be a great idea to include exactly what Mark Zuckerberg said! This paragraph is a bit better than the first one, but it still needs some work. The reader already knows that mining user data is a big issue, so the topic sentence would be a great place to make a point about why more stringent government regulations would most effectively protect user data.

Example Body Paragraph: Though Facebook claims to be implementing company policies that will protect user data and stop the spread of misinformation , its attempts have been unsuccessful compared to those made by the federal government. First, the topic sentences get to the point. It gives a clear reason why our claim in favor of more stringent government regulations is a good claim : because Facebook has failed to self-regulate its practices.

This paragraph also provides strong evidence and specific examples that support the point made in the topic sentence. Perhaps most importantly, though, this writer explains why the evidence is important. The bold sentence in the example is where the writer links the evidence back to their opinion. In this case, they explain that the pressure from Federal Trade Commission and Congress—and the threat of regulation—have helped change Facebook for the better.

Like in this example paragraph, you just have to effectively develop your position by appropriately and convincingly relying on evidence from good sources. This is all great information, right? This tip applies to every aspect of writing an argumentative essay. Define your position clearly in your thesis statement and stick to that position! The thesis is the backbone of your paper, and every paragraph should help prove your thesis in one way or another.

Nothing is as powerful as good, strong evidence. Then you can paraphrase, briefly summarize, or quote from your sources as you incorporate them into your paragraphs. Keep in mind that argumentative essays are just one type of essay you might encounter. But what about admissions essays? Not only do we have comprehensive guides to the Coalition App and Common App essays, we also have tons of individual college application guides, too.

You can search through all of our college-specific posts by clicking here. As a content writer for PrepScholar, Ashley is passionate about giving college-bound students the in-depth information they need to get into the school of their dreams.

Our new student and parent forum, at ExpertHub. See how other students and parents are navigating high school, college, and the college admissions process. Use the Library catalogue. Library catalogue, Canadian Research Index, Government web sites.

Article indexes. Statistics Canada, Canadian Research Index, journal articles. Library catalogue, web sites. Many of these sources can be located online through the library catalogue and electronic databases, or on the Web. You may be able to retrieve the actual information electronically or you may have to visit a library to find the information in print. This is simply a list of the various options available to you.

Consult your separate assignment sheet to clarify the number and type of sources expected. Once you have made your pro and con lists, compare the information side by side. Considering your audience, as well as your own viewpoint, choose the position you will take. Considering your audience does not mean playing up to the professor or the TA. To convince a particular person that your own views are sound, you have to consider his or her way of thinking.

You will have to make specific decisions about the terms you should explain, the background information you should supply, and the details you need to convince that particular reader. Assert the thesis your view of the issue. More on thesis statements can be found below. One effective way of introducing a topic is to place it in context — to supply a kind of backdrop that will put it in perspective.

You should discuss the area into which your topic fits, and then gradually lead into your specific field of discussion re: your thesis statement. Give evidence for argument. You can generate counterarguments by asking yourself what someone who disagrees with you might say about each of the points you've made or about your position as a whole. Once you have thought up some counterarguments, consider how you will respond to them--will you concede that your opponent has a point but explain why your audience should nonetheless accept your argument?

Will you reject the counterargument and explain why it is mistaken? Either way, you will want to leave your reader with a sense that your argument is stronger than opposing arguments. When you are summarizing opposing arguments, be charitable. Present each argument fairly and objectively, rather than trying to make it look foolish.

You want to show that you have seriously considered the many sides of the issue, and that you are not simply attacking or mocking your opponents. It is usually better to consider one or two serious counterarguments in some depth, rather than to give a long but superficial list of many different counterarguments and replies. Be sure that your reply is consistent with your original argument. If considering a counterargument changes your position, you will need to go back and revise your original argument accordingly.

You may have more than 3 overall points to your argument, but you should not have fewer. Provide a plan of action but do not introduce new information. The simplest and most basic conclusion is one that restates the thesis in different words and then discusses its implications. A thesis is a one- sentence statement about your topic.

It's an assertion about your topic, something you claim to be true. Notice that a topic alone makes no such claim; it merely defines an area to be covered. To make your topic into a thesis statement , you need to make a claim about it, make it into a sentence.

Look back over your materials--brainstorms, investigative notes, etc. Think about what your readers want or need to know. Then write a sentence, preferably at this point, a simple one, stating what will be the central idea of your paper. The result should look something like this:. Original Subject: an important issue in my major field.

Focused Topic: media technology education for communication majors. Thesis: Communication majors at this University receive a solid background in theories of media technology. Notice, though, that a sentence stating an obvious and indisputable truth won't work as a thesis:. That's a complete sentence, and it asserts something to be true, but as a thesis it's a dead end.

It's a statement of fact, pure and simple, and requires little or nothing added. A good thesis asks to have more said about it. It demands some proof. Your job is to show your reader that your thesis is true. Remember, you can't just pluck a thesis out of thin air. Even if you have remarkable insight concerning a topic, it won't be worth much unless you can logically and persuasively support it in the body of your essay.

A thesis is the evolutionary result of a thinking process, not a miraculous creation. Formulating a thesis is not the first thing you do after reading the essay assignment. Deciding on a thesis does not come first. Before you can come up with an argument on any topic, you have to collect and organize evidence, look for possible relationships between known facts such as surprising contrasts or similarities , and think about the beneath-the-surface significance of these relationships.

After this initial exploration of the question at hand, you can formulate a "working thesis," an argument that you think will make sense of the evidence but that may need adjustment along the way. Many students make the mistake of thinking that the content of their paper is all that matters. You may have some great ideas in your paper but if you cannot effectively communicate them, you will not receive a very good mark. Keep the following in mind when writing your paper:.

Diction refers to the choice of words for the expression of ideas; the construction, disposition, and application of words in your essay, with regard to clearness, accuracy, variety, etc. There is often a tendency for students to use fancy words and extravagant images in hopes that it will make them sound more intelligent when in fact the result is a confusing mess. Although this approach can sometimes be effective, it is advisable that you choose clear words and be as precise in the expression of your ideas as possible.

Creating clear paragraphs is essential. Paragraphs come in so many sizes and patterns that no single formula could possibly cover them all. The two basic principles to remember are these:. As a general rule, you should address only one major idea per paragraph.

In other words you must carefully and clearly organize the order of your paragraphs so that they are logically positioned throughout your paper. Transitions will help you with this. In academic writing your goal is to convey information clearly and concisely, if not to convert the reader to your way of thinking.

Transitions help you to achieve these goals by establishing logical connections between sentences, paragraphs, and sections of your papers.

An argumentative essay requires you to decide on a topic and take a position on it.

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Resume for first part time job Sometimes, the best ideas are sparked by looking at many different options. You'll need to back up your viewpoint with well-researched facts and information as well. What Makes Argumentative Essays Unique? Or you can talk about GMO foods or organic or locally grown produce. By Paul Richard Kuehn.

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A number of these topics are rather controversial—that's the point. In an argumentative essay, opinions matter and controversy is based on opinions, which are, hopefully, backed up by facts. If these topics are a little too controversial or you don't find the right one for you, try browsing through persuasive essay and speech topics as well. Share Flipboard Email. An Introduction to Essay Writing. Introduction Choosing a Topic.

Writing an Introduction. Structuring and Outlining. Types of Essays. Editing and Improving. Grace Fleming. Education Expert. Grace Fleming, M. Updated April 01, Tips It's best if you have a general interest in your subject, but the argument you choose doesn't have to be one that you agree with. Cite this Article Format. Fleming, Grace. Bad Essay Topics for College Admissions. Tips on How to Write an Argumentative Essay. The Common Application Essay Prompts. When representing the opposite opinion, make sure that it is the basic common opinion that is being represented.

Once the research is done, you need to come up with a strong thesis and outline the rest of the essay. Make sure that points and arguments are clearly laid out and have a logical progression. You are encouraged to both take a side and argue it through writing.

Another element of a position essay that needs attention in the writing is how to present the opposing argument. Avoid undercutting the opposing argument in its presentation. The point is to argue for your position. Do not destroy your credibility by being unnecessarily negative about the opposing view. If you need help with your essay writing tasks, you can rely on our expert writers to research and write a high-quality college paper for you.

Personal Writer is a professional custom research and writing service that has been on the market of academic writing for 11 years. Academic Writing Business Writing. Web Writing Editing Proofreading. User account menu Log in Search. Academic writing fees Business writing fees Web writing fees. You're on the page of custom research paper writing service Calculate Price Order completely original, custom written academic paper or essay from experts. How to Write a Position Essay The first step in writing a position essay is to select a topic that has clearly defined differing opinions.

Outline Template Introduction Provide background on the topic Present a strong thesis that supports one side of the issue Body Argue the points that support position and thesis Fairly present opposing viewpoints Conclusion Recap thesis Focus on key points If you need help with your essay writing tasks, you can rely on our expert writers to research and write a high-quality college paper for you.

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It is important to note that each paragraph in the body of the essay must have some logical connection to the thesis statement in the opening paragraph. Some paragraphs will directly support the thesis statement with evidence collected during research. It is also important to explain how and why the evidence supports the thesis warrant. However, argumentative essays should also consider and explain differing points of view regarding the topic.

Depending on the length of the assignment, students should dedicate one or two paragraphs of an argumentative essay to discussing conflicting opinions on the topic. Rather than explaining how these differing opinions are wrong outright, students should note how opinions that do not align with their thesis might not be well informed or how they might be out of date. The argumentative essay requires well-researched, accurate, detailed, and current information to support the thesis statement and consider other points of view.

Some factual, logical, statistical, or anecdotal evidence should support the thesis. However, students must consider multiple points of view when collecting evidence. As noted in the paragraph above, a successful and well-rounded argumentative essay will also discuss opinions not aligning with the thesis. It is unethical to exclude evidence that may not support the thesis. It is at this point of the essay that students may begin to struggle. This is the portion of the essay that will leave the most immediate impression on the mind of the reader.

Therefore, it must be effective and logical. Do not introduce any new information into the conclusion; rather, synthesize the information presented in the body of the essay. Restate why the topic is important, review the main points, and review your thesis.

You may also want to include a short discussion of more research that should be completed in light of your work. Perhaps it is helpful to think of an essay in terms of a conversation or debate with a classmate. If I were to discuss the cause of World War II and its current effect on those who lived through the tumultuous time, there would be a beginning, middle, and end to the conversation. In fact, if I were to end the argument in the middle of my second point, questions would arise concerning the current effects on those who lived through the conflict.

Therefore, the argumentative essay must be complete, and logically so, leaving no doubt as to its intent or argument. A common method for writing an argumentative essay is the five-paragraph approach. This is, however, by no means the only formula for writing such essays. If it sounds straightforward, that is because it is; in fact, the method consists of a an introductory paragraph b three evidentiary body paragraphs that may include discussion of opposing views and c a conclusion.

To convince a particular person that your own views are sound, you have to consider his or her way of thinking. You will have to make specific decisions about the terms you should explain, the background information you should supply, and the details you need to convince that particular reader.

Assert the thesis your view of the issue. More on thesis statements can be found below. One effective way of introducing a topic is to place it in context — to supply a kind of backdrop that will put it in perspective. You should discuss the area into which your topic fits, and then gradually lead into your specific field of discussion re: your thesis statement. Give evidence for argument. You can generate counterarguments by asking yourself what someone who disagrees with you might say about each of the points you've made or about your position as a whole.

Once you have thought up some counterarguments, consider how you will respond to them--will you concede that your opponent has a point but explain why your audience should nonetheless accept your argument? Will you reject the counterargument and explain why it is mistaken?

Either way, you will want to leave your reader with a sense that your argument is stronger than opposing arguments. When you are summarizing opposing arguments, be charitable. Present each argument fairly and objectively, rather than trying to make it look foolish.

You want to show that you have seriously considered the many sides of the issue, and that you are not simply attacking or mocking your opponents. It is usually better to consider one or two serious counterarguments in some depth, rather than to give a long but superficial list of many different counterarguments and replies.

Be sure that your reply is consistent with your original argument. If considering a counterargument changes your position, you will need to go back and revise your original argument accordingly. You may have more than 3 overall points to your argument, but you should not have fewer. Provide a plan of action but do not introduce new information.

The simplest and most basic conclusion is one that restates the thesis in different words and then discusses its implications. A thesis is a one- sentence statement about your topic. It's an assertion about your topic, something you claim to be true. Notice that a topic alone makes no such claim; it merely defines an area to be covered.

To make your topic into a thesis statement , you need to make a claim about it, make it into a sentence. Look back over your materials--brainstorms, investigative notes, etc. Think about what your readers want or need to know. Then write a sentence, preferably at this point, a simple one, stating what will be the central idea of your paper. The result should look something like this:. Original Subject: an important issue in my major field.

Focused Topic: media technology education for communication majors. Thesis: Communication majors at this University receive a solid background in theories of media technology. Notice, though, that a sentence stating an obvious and indisputable truth won't work as a thesis:. That's a complete sentence, and it asserts something to be true, but as a thesis it's a dead end.

It's a statement of fact, pure and simple, and requires little or nothing added. A good thesis asks to have more said about it. It demands some proof. Your job is to show your reader that your thesis is true.

Remember, you can't just pluck a thesis out of thin air. Even if you have remarkable insight concerning a topic, it won't be worth much unless you can logically and persuasively support it in the body of your essay. A thesis is the evolutionary result of a thinking process, not a miraculous creation.

Formulating a thesis is not the first thing you do after reading the essay assignment. Deciding on a thesis does not come first. Before you can come up with an argument on any topic, you have to collect and organize evidence, look for possible relationships between known facts such as surprising contrasts or similarities , and think about the beneath-the-surface significance of these relationships. After this initial exploration of the question at hand, you can formulate a "working thesis," an argument that you think will make sense of the evidence but that may need adjustment along the way.

Many students make the mistake of thinking that the content of their paper is all that matters. You may have some great ideas in your paper but if you cannot effectively communicate them, you will not receive a very good mark. Keep the following in mind when writing your paper:. Diction refers to the choice of words for the expression of ideas; the construction, disposition, and application of words in your essay, with regard to clearness, accuracy, variety, etc.

There is often a tendency for students to use fancy words and extravagant images in hopes that it will make them sound more intelligent when in fact the result is a confusing mess. Although this approach can sometimes be effective, it is advisable that you choose clear words and be as precise in the expression of your ideas as possible. Creating clear paragraphs is essential. Paragraphs come in so many sizes and patterns that no single formula could possibly cover them all.

The two basic principles to remember are these:. As a general rule, you should address only one major idea per paragraph. In other words you must carefully and clearly organize the order of your paragraphs so that they are logically positioned throughout your paper. Transitions will help you with this.

In academic writing your goal is to convey information clearly and concisely, if not to convert the reader to your way of thinking. Transitions help you to achieve these goals by establishing logical connections between sentences, paragraphs, and sections of your papers. In other words, transitions tell readers what to do with the information you present them.

Whether single words, quick phrases or full sentences, they function as signs for readers that tell them how to think about, organize, and react to old and new ideas as they read through what you have written. Transitions signal relationships between ideas. Basically, transitions provide the reader with directions for how to piece together your ideas into a logically coherent argument.

They are words with particular meanings that tell the reader to think and react in a particular way to your ideas. In providing the reader with these important cues, transitions help readers understand the logic of how your ideas fit together. Cause and Effect. Additional Support or Evidence. You must make certain that your paper is free from grammar and spelling mistakes. Mechanical errors are usually the main reason for lack of clarity in essays, so be sure to thoroughly proof read your paper before handing it in.

For help with common errors in grammar and usage consult the following websites:. Plagiarism is a form of stealing; as with other offences against the law, ignorance is no excuse.